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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and orchestra of young musicians from islam have been touring south america using instruments constructed entirely from recycled materials. they pulled them from the rubbish dumps around their homes. you can get more on our web sites bbc.com on those stories and many more. the spanish tenor coming go has performed in front of 20,000 people to raise money and awareness for youth orchestra in the violence-plagued city of acapulco. ♪ he was joined by 320 young performers were in july the orchestra was for a risk children between 8-18 years of age. most of the youngsters have little or no music express before joining. a quick update from the central african republic or rebels seized much of the country have renewed their threat to enter the capital. the president says he's ready to form a national anti-government after the coalition launched a rebellion earlier this month. >> the headlines here on bbc world news. politicians in washington are facing another day of intense negotiations. they have got to reach a deal to prevent damaging tax rises and spending cuts. hillary clinton is in the h
and things in china. so the growth in the america, south america and emerging markets. when you look at food service, even on some slower, you know, flattish type growth over the second and third quarters, the margin increases that we've had i think people are starting to see why the combination of these two as you showed earlier, cranes, plus food service equals profit. liz: okay. i mean i definitely see that but you just mentioned europe. where is the growth in your crane business? who is, buying your cranes? sorry, is it asia, or you just mentioned south america s that sort of a brazil pre-olympics play? >> i think actually it is sort of obviously brazil but there is chile, peru, colombia, all have been good markets and so, you know, the americas has been good. if you look at what is going on in the energy and the, the energy and the petro chem type business, the fracking is good type business and boom trucks that has driven the growth. you have australia's been good. russia is coming back. after can has been a good story this year. i think you put all that together on the crane side it o
, which countries do you envision south america, africa, you wrote about india obviously. in to be applied in and share our objectives? >> interesting brazil has carved out the identity. they always have trouble making arrangements to do missions of brazil. they are more standoffish. because of geography in west africa over the force of a decade so brazil would not be cost file to the united states but it would be independent with its own point* of view. says that may lead to argentina and develop their balance against brazil. it is strategic about the united states has gotten since the cold wear to asia -- from the rise of the cold war. it has been over hyped but within ds 2012 it is the enormous development. of the indian policy establishment would reject it like a diseased germ. with india aware it is on the map with the economic and military rise is against china. we should not get concessions but anchorage development in a way that we can. >> with your presentation of your book with the u.s. and everything here is absolutely clear. speenine. [laughter] could you talk about israel? a c
, five years. we have central and south america and all of asia including china. there's so many opportunities to grow hello kitty as well, too. if we want to double our company's size, we need more. >> that's your goal. what's the time frame for accomplishing that? >> we're looking for something like five years. in these five years we have increased our market cap for five times larger. and what we want to do is to continue that. 20% to 30% growth. >> and acquisitions as you say will be a key part here. what targets are you looking at and what's funding like for purchases you want to make? >> we have a cash position of close to 400 million u.s. dollars. and we have a deficit stimulus side. basically we don't have debt. we can finance, as well. but we have cash flows. so there's no worry about the cash. >> okay. >> yeah. i was going to -- in terms of extending the brands, how do you embrace the digital arena here in things like ebooks and -- >> yes. we just started amazon.com program with mr. man and little miss. it's really since jettic. especially the small kids love digital ip
and is a beautiful facility but more importantly there have been new routes added from europe and south america, direct service into las vegas and that opened up 50 markets in latin america for us and las vegas particularly the cosmopolitan really resonates. dennis: surprising given the fears of global recession that you're getting international guests. when i read about the hotel-casino is almost beside the point. it gets one line in a 13 line paragraph, you have a new ice skating rink. what is going on? >> the casino is a central part of las vegas and that is why people came here and continue to come here. 80% of people to las vegas game. that is an important segment of our business. that being said, what sets casinos and hotels apart are the other amenities. for us it is the guest rooms, residential style guest room with terraces where you can step out on your terrace and engage in las vegas and on the strip in a way that can't be done in other places. in the pool district where the ice rink opened a few weeks ago sits about 100 feet above the strips to you tonight skate and looked down at t
of the ski resort lifestyle and they'll travel to find it. whether that's south america in the summer or it's the russians because their local snow is not that good or really americans and europeans who are back and forth between the alps, canadian rocky, rockies. even right now when aspen and vail aren't having the best early season, we're having tremendous snow through the canadian rockies, british columbia and alberta. those resorts are opening early. hotels are full. right now of course you're having this string wind river i believe they're calling it which is dumping tons of snow on the high sierras. they'll be digging out the snow lifts. >> if you've had poor snow the previous season, how does that then -- must reflect into people buying equipment and clothes. snowfall presumably spills out not just into the people who go to the resort, but all the equipment manufacturers get impacted, do they? >> absolutely. we had a really interesting situation that happened over the last couple years. we had a lean year last year which was following a very what we'd call an epic year where it just
of miles away from where the end consumer is. how do you actually know what consumers let's say in south america, africa actually like in terms of fragrances? >> it's imminently linked to the culture of a local country. especially on the state side, especially on the flavor side. so we don't create fragrances and flavors for the indians and the chinese. we have 9,000 people around the world. half of them create the next fragrances and flavors. and out of those 4,500 people, you have roughly 2,000 people who are actually in those countries. they are local people so we are chinese employees, chinese favors, will create those fragrances and flavors for the whole market. because, again, you can't know about the local culture out of switzerland. so you have to by there. and we have there in all of those countries so we do expensive consumer tests. we do expensive consumer insight. we drive the trend and that's helpful to grow in those markets. >> another factor that's created a lot of headache is the strength. how difficult is it to be a globally operating company that's based here in switzer
, nearly a third of the market will be north and south america. a third will be europe and russia and africa. and about a third of the market will be asia pacific. and in china's case, to your point, china now has replaced the united states as the largest auto market. the chinese veitremendous respe for history. they know about henry ford and lincoln. so we'll be bringing the first lincoln vehicles to china in 2014. >> alan mulally, ford president and ceo. thank you for coming on. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> now this. an infant left without her parents after an nfl player just snaps. and now as a city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> if syria's chemical weapons are on the move, who's watching them? and where do they end up? >>> plus, as eight more people die in chicago -- >> we walk through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't figure out what they had done with the money. >> -- cnn investigates the program getting cash to st
to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggressive rivals in canada and south america. that is pitting them against unions, which are struggling to reserve high-paying jobs for the middle-class members. it was resolved late tuesday, according to this article. here is the front page of the press." feet frefree state says detroit out of time to fix its fiscal mess. falling revenues and rising expenses. the state of michigan delivered an abrupt ultimatum to the city wednesday. move quickly toward reform, or an emergency financial manager will be reported. -- a ppointed. -- appointed. dana in california, republican. caller: i'm 56 years old. i live in california. i can give the perspective of what has happened in my state and the economy and all that stuff. back in 1982, i was making $8.50 an hour. but i have seen happen in my state and happening in more, not just illegal immigrants, but our children. i have watched my state do a nose dive. people cannot afford more things. i'm watching them destroy our social system, our schools. it is absolute insanity, but i see happeni
should be worn in for a new six-year term in january. >> romo says this will move markets all over south america too. >> when you heard the announcement, a lot of people said it sounded like his good-bye. >> certainly did. >> 16 minutes past the hour. >>> extended look for our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart and twitter and facebook. search for early start cnn. >>> coming up this sunday on the next list, a successful arts studio, but he made his mark on the corporate world as cofounder of square. >> it allows small businesses to accept credit cards. his company worth billions. but he's still an artist at heart. >> art is what can't be proven mathematically, right? where science ends, the part that makes you feel good, but you don't know why. the way the object feels in your hand and looks, and if it's perfectly created, you can almost explain it to somebody else afterward. but in the creation part, you can't. you can see how glass is hon stantly moving. my job is to shape it. balance it at the same time. you can do that, you get these wonderful shapes. glass really rewards risk.
today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and others. >> what are they doing with that power? that's the interesting thing. >> so they have the power, and they are using it. you have states like kansas and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you have a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican and are aggressively promoting pro energyer drilling policies to get at the pir natural resources. and the big story you mentioned was what is happening with right to work. and it wasn't just michigan. sometimes we forget that earlier indiana was a right to work state too. so two midwestern states that are traditionally m heavy unionized moved to the right to work. i wouldn't be surprised if we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting i contrast in maryland and virginia. in virginian you have republican governor cutting taxes and cutting s
in european europe and hard in south africa and latin america but i think there is some hope that the dynamics can carry them through. >> the united states has to play an active leadership role rather than a passive leadership role. if the united states is passive and barack obama represents democratic ideas that it should be more passive this is the kind of world that results. i think places like egypt and even syria were looking to the united states to have a presence in this transition, but we have not seen the have and we're seen the results. >> paul: where is the potential of flash points? >> we don't talk about europe enough. the crisis in europe has not turned the corner. it's going to get dra mat kli worse. in portugal, spain, italy, there isening political dysfunction. that is going to encourage russia to make moves of its own. you mention south africa, south africa is not going in 'n a good direction. it was supposed to be the most optimistic spot. maybe new zealand but somebody told me they are heading south. >> paul: coming down to obamacare. big changes may be coming for 2013 for
. chief justice john roberts. great can conservative goes south on obamacare breaking the hearts of conservatives all over america. >> what did he do. >> ? he voted for obamacare, to uphold it as constitutional and he said it was a tax. not a fee. >> well, it needs more clarification. >> south carolina senator jim demint, who is resigning his senate seat and becoming the president of the heritage foundation, which in effect is an admission that the tea party forces where he was their mentor and benefactor, that they are a spent force in the senate at least. >> what kind of a salary does that job have? >> a million plus with a little financial incentive. >> a million bucks a year. >> that has nothing to do withth him going over there, though? >> i think it has something to do with it. >> i would say the abandonment by this administration of a 30-year ally. namely, mubarak in egypt in such a way that it lost and undermine the confidence of the entire arab world in the loyalty and credibility of america as an ally. >> i put morsy in there. >> i did. >> it goes to president obama fro
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
on earth. best way to play it, kansas city southern. the new railroad running north/south across north america, or as they sometimes call themselves, the nafta railroad. at last, maybe we can get some revenge for all of the jobs nafta has caused us. all of the losses. anyway, ksu is my new favorite rail. and i think you can buy it at the weakest because it's got the tracks where people want them and little competition to boot. let's go to greg in mississippi, greg? >> yes, mr. cramer, thank you so much for taking my call. >> my pleasure. >> caller: i had the pleasure of speaking to you on the "lightning round" a couple of months ago about nordic tanker. >> yeah, go ahead, i'm sorry. >> caller: no, no, i'm sorry, at that time you recommended me not go into that particular stock. i was just wondering, you highly recommended it in your book getting back to even which i thoroughly enjoyed, and i was curious if anything changed in particular with the company or that sector in general. >> i had to back away from it. and i think those who know the show and watch it know that i've backed away
, and south america, which we really don't have now. really makes us a global powerhouse. >> you know, is the underwear business and the jeans business a bigger business than the suit business for example? >> yes. the underwear business worldwide is over a billion dollars in sales and jeans business is close to $2 billion. so those are the two largest categories followed by fragrance which is about a billion and a half dollars. >> when you did the tommy deal you knocked the cover off the ball. you put some numbers out. you delevered the company quickly. now you're back doing the warnerco deal. is this going to be as transformational? >> i think in some ways it's going to be more transformational. it really opens up two key markets for us to operate directly. today we are operating on joint ventures and licensing arrangements. so in asia, china specifically, ind india, and in latin america with brazil, you know, really opening up the developing economies, where warnaco, in those two areas approaching 20%. >> phillips-van heusen, to be able to transform it from what we think of when we
? i will talk about the bricks in a minute. i am talking about south america, eastern europe, parts of asia. why do i love this story? it is basic macroeconomics. the key ingredients that drive growth. we know the story of debt, deficit, fiscal cliff. we know that the story of the aging population and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50
to the south and the tropics, into the 30s there. let's head on into the americas. central portions are looking calm and clear. a storm from the pacific, dropping down from b.c. to central california. chilly showers to post coastal areas. and we'll be seeing some snow, a few inches on the sierra nevadas and moving inland as well. strongest gusts bringing temperatures down in portions of southern california in the next couple of days. out toward the east, we've been watching a stubborn system move away out over the atlantic, but what will be left over is heavy showers in the eastern gulf states as well as in the florida peninsula and you can see some severe thunderstorms erupting there too. here are temperatures. a big drop out in the northeast. new york city, 9 degrees today. 9 in d.c. a drop of 10 degrees between monday and tuesday. further up toward the north. that's your high temperature. winnipeg, minus 20. high temperature, even down to houston, 13 for the high. but overnight lows will be around the freezing point. as for europe, not too much to worry about for western and central location
that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources and of course, the big story that you mentioned, paul, is what's happening with right to work, it wasn't just michigan, sometimes we forget earlier indiana became a right to work state, too, so, two midwestern states that have traditionally been pretty heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and vi
casualties -- well, i should say 500 thais died in south vietnam while fighting what we call the veitkong, and it's important to focus on it because they tend to dismiss them as america's mercenaries because we paid for the -- a lot of the military hardware and transportation and lo gist ticks and extry pay that the thai troops received, and we focus on thais engaged in black market schemes, but truth behind it all is that thai soldiers were figging. thai soldiers were dying for four years. thailand was carrying out their war, what they saw as their war in south vietnam so the casualties are something to keep in mind. >> host: professor ruth, thai-u.s. relations, when did they start to really jell? they were an ally for a long time participating in the iraq war and world war ii. >> guest: absolutely. it can date back to king monk and famous example of offering lincoln war elephants for his troubles for the american civil war, but definitely in the 20th century, the thais were always close u.s. ally. i mean, and this is intensified really disrurpted partly during the second war ii, but as
. that average has fallen 10 cents in just the past week. the lowest state average in america, missouri, $2.95 a gallon. tennessee, south carolina, oklahoma, they could fall below $3 in the next couple of days. all right, big deal. that puts money into the economy, by the way. so let's go to mcdonald's -- let's not go to mcdonald's. let's go to nicole to talk about mcdonald's. the mcrib is back? nicole: either way i would go to mcdonald's with you. the mcrib is traditionally a great product for mcdonald's. launches their season. this barbecue pork sandwich has a following, stuart. they are introducing it once again now this holiday season. they have been doing well with the breakfast. they have been doing well with low-priced offerings in europe. there's a lot of high hope -- high hope on the mcrib. stuart: just doing it for december, is that correct? nicole: i think that's correct. i want to double check. i'm hesitant to say it wholeheartedly. i think that's correct. stuart: you haven't checked, in other words. you haven't been down to mcdonald's and checked? all right, you said enough. ni
to build a new airport south of the metropolitan area of chicago. >> airports are the one thing we do in america that people get when it comes to the partnerships. there's always criticism of this, criticism that the governments don't have money, there are criticisms that governments don't make the rht decisions. the city of chicago famously struggled with its public/private partnership on its parking meters in 2008. the city leased its system to a group of private investigators. they did a poor job of managing the transition. there were steep rate hikes and confusion and it resulted in the downgrade of the city's credit rating. i know that's not one of your projects. >> no, that's right. >> what are the lessons of that type of thing for your own initiatives? >> you got to be very careful. you know, the city also did one with the skyway, a bridge across from chicago to indiana. that was done in a better fashion. if it's not carefully done, it can really backfire. so that's why we take each step and do it in a very reasonable sound way. we're embarking on this. this is brand new for ou
% in the west. we were you were 50%, 60% in the south and in the northeast. so we had great strength in many areas but areas like the government, the center region, canada, latin america, we had poor execution. >> now, you do some work -- this is the first time i asked you about this. for the oil and gas industry. what do you guys do for oil and gas? we know what do you for amazon, what you do for retailers and for government. i never heard you talk about this sector. >> oil and gas is a big data problem. we look at massive amounts of data and define patterns so people know where to drill so that's on one hand and then on the other hand it's an integration problem. they have lots of sources of data that need to be integrated and they need to manage their supply chains so we are the infrastructure for that industry. >> so in other words like they get a reservoir map and you figure out what is likelihood of where oil could be found. >> yeah, yeah. we look at massive amounts of data and we find patterns in that data. no different than what i do with my basketball team. who do i sell jerseys do
and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses welcome to the world leader in derivatives. welcome to superderivatives. >>> we already bailed out a couple of its auto companies, but now should the federal government bail out the entire city of detroit? incredibly, some say yes. ahead of president obama's visit to detroit monday, that will be his first in nearly eight months, detroit councilwoman e joe -- joanne watson thinks so. >> our peopl
poverty trends in america. so there are pockets in the south, pockets in the appalachian mountains, pockets in urban areas that where there's poverty, there is going to be people needing help. and you know what? they're finding givelocally.net can deliver their needs quickerer, more efficiently than anything out there. we're passionate about helping as many as we can. >> is it set up as a corporation or a nonprofit? >> we made a kshgz decision not to be a 501(c)3 for many reasons, including there's no limit to where we can direct the money. so we can help anyone with any need that's legitimate. but here is the thing. the 501(c)3 exemption was added to this tax code in 1917. as beau said, there are more than 1 million registered 501(c)3s right now and poverty is at its historic high. if you're a business, that's a model one could argue isn't working. we're letting the market decide. we're letting the american people decide. do you want to give $50, $75, $100 on givelocally.net? >> how do you pay your expenses? >> as a start-up with investment, we create jobs and pay our people. but
than any other in america. that is in thanks in part to the next, what used to be considered trash and poultry producers in that south, chicken feed. joining us, the man who runs the port of savannah, executive director of the georgian port authority. thank you, so much, for being here. we will get to it in a moment, but congratulations on being the fastest growing container port. how faster you growing and how are you doing? >> well, it is great to be here with you today. thank you. for the last decade our container facilities imports have grown at a compound in annual growth rate of ten and a half%. that is about double the next fastest growing part in the nation that has allowed us to become the fourth busiest container port in the country. ashley: i also understand their is a dredging project under way or about to get under way which will actually make the river there 5 feet deeper. what kind of impact will that have on the port's business? >> well, it is a critically important project for us. the river itself is the federal channel. the current studies have approved the deepen
efforts. but then out of no, where senator inouye south recognition. he knew that it was trying to get for millions of these young people living in america, a chance to serve their nation and prove their love and become legal in america, become citizens in america. and he took the floor, and i want to read what he said because it touched me. he said: madam president, i wish to step back in history if i may. on december 7, 1941, something terrible happened in hawaiile three weeks later the government hoff the united states declared that all japanese americans, citizens born in the united states or of japanese ancestry were to be considered enemy aliens, at a result, like these undocumented people, they could not put on the uniform of this lan. senator inouye went on to say, i was 17 at the time and naturally i resented this because i loved my country and wanted to put on the uniform to show where my heart stood. but we were denied. so we petitioned the government. the a year later they said, okay. i if you wish to volunteer, go ahead. senator inouye said, well to make a long story shor
increase on january 1. colleagues, republicans as well as democrats, sign now, the signal that america needs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, yesterday speaker boehner sent a letter to the president in response to his unreasonable proposal to how congress can avert the fiscal cliff. shortly after the election, the house republican leadership presented the president with a balanced framework of coupling spending come cutlers and reforms. it also states, quote, regrettably the proposal outlined on behalf of your administration contains very little in the way of common ground. the proposal calls for a $1.6 trillion in new tax revenue, twice the amount you supported during the campaign. end of quote. house republicans understand the necessity of finding a reasonable solution. we have made it very clear, we're willing to work with the senate leadership to find middle ground legi
years out, 20 years out. he wants to keep the game robust, keep it america's pastime. and obviously, he wants to keep participation high because that will keep popularity high. >> we come from the football capital of the country, the south, where it's a ritual. but, i mean, i have friends in the south whose kids don't play. >> let me tell you, i played football from the time i was 8 years old, from 8 to 18. it was my life. we watched, you know, s.e.c. football every saturday. sunday. >> they have helmets when you played? >> yeah, they did. >>letter? >> yeah, they were leather. >> that explanation's out the door. >> watched nfl on sunday. it was our life. but i will tell you, i did not ever really want my kids to play football. it's gotten too dangerous. >> scary. >> we're going to have to reexamine what we do. >> to hear big football fans like you guys say shows that t real issue. >> not only big football fans but, you know, 6'4". i weigh way too much. i still don't know that i would -- >> 5'11". >> yeah. see, you get broken in half on the field. >> what do you run the 40 in? >> i used
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)